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Medical Matters and Aging Seniors Well-being for Aging Seniors

Telehealth: How It Works and Why It’s So Beneficial

This article was originally posted on Seniors Guide

For patients who are homebound, telehealth may be the next best thing to an in-person doctor visit. Telehealth is a broad term defined as any part of the healthcare system practiced remotely, using digital information and communication technologies. If you monitor your health on a mobile health app, that

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Medical Matters and Aging Seniors Well-being for Aging Seniors

How to Help a Senior Safely Manage Allergy Season

This article was shared on AgingCare.com

Unfortunately, some of the nicest weather and foliage during the year are accompanied by an onslaught of allergens. As pollen fills the air, people afflicted by seasonal allergies begin to groan.

The 2018 National Health Interview Survey found that 19.2 million Americans over age 18 had been diagnosed with hay fever (allergic rhinitis) in the past 12 months. While allergies are often considered a condition that presents earlier in life, seniors are not exempt from bothersome allergy symptoms. In fact, research suggests that age-related changes to the immune system may leave older adults at greater risk for autoimmune diseases, infections and allergic inflammation. To complicate matters further, seniors often have chronic diseases and take multiple medications that can make it difficult to diagnose, manage and treat their seasonal allergies.

Tips for Managing Allergies in the Elderly

Christopher Randolph, M.D., Fellow of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and allergist/immunologist in private practice in Connecticut, offers the following suggestions to help caregivers make allergy season more bearable for their aging loved ones.

  1. Look for Allergy Symptoms
    Allergies don

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Financial and Legal Matters and Seniors Medical Matters and Aging Seniors

List of Important Items To Have Available During This Coronavirus

For years, before the coronavirus pandemic, we advised clients to have important legal and health documents in a file or folder and to tell family members the location of the file so they were available in an emergency. The current pandemic has added a few extra dimensions to what you need to include if a loved one requires hospitalization.

Remember that visitors are NOT allowed in hospitals. It will become difficult, if not impossible, to get these items to your loved one and if they do not bring them with them when admitted to a hospital.

  1. Clearly written and UPDATED accurate list of medications: name, dose, frequency and name, and phone number of the prescribing doctor.
  2. The name of your primary treating physician, their office number, emergency number, office address.
  3. Legal documents including Health Care Proxy, Advance Directive, and/or POLST (Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, printed on a single sheet and in a bright or neon color).
  4. A complete and updated written list of emergency contacts and phone numbers, including the password for your phone. Remember, you may be unconscious; your phone may be locked. There will be no way for medical staffers to contact your next of kin.
  5. If you have a pacemaker or defibrillator: a copy of the pocket information card that states the brand, model number, MRI compatibility. The same goes for any medical device, like a port or pump.
  6. If you use inhalers, bring them.
  7. Extra batteries for hearing aid or other medical devices.
  8. Prescription eye drops.
  9. Bring a cell phone charger. Bring a spare if you can, and if you have extra batteries, bring those too.
  10. Inexpensive headset.
  11. Pack up a toothbrush, toothpaste, underwear in a plastic bag, and any hair items you need.

Article provided by Stephen J. Silverberg, Attorney at Law, Founder of the Law Office of Stephen J. Silverberg, one of New York

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Medical Matters and Aging Seniors

Dementia Care Dos & Don

This article was originally posted on APlaceForMom.com

Mid-to-late stage dementia often presents a variety of challenging behavioral problems. This discussion of common symptoms may help prepare you to effectively support a person with dementia.

What Patient Behavior Is Typical of Dementia?

Anger, confusion, anxiety, and sadness are a few of the emotional symptoms a dementia patient might experience. The overwhelming nature of these feelings often results in a range of unpredictable behaviors that requires the caregiver to be extremely patient. A dementia patient may become irritable and even belligerent, with little provocation. He or she may go in and out of being confused and disoriented, or even attempt to manipulate those around them. Struggling with communication is one of the most upsetting aspects of taking care of someone with Alzheimer

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Medical Matters and Aging Seniors

High Blood Pressure and Cold Medicine Don’t Mix

Some over-the-counter flu remedies can elevate pressure, interfere with meds.

This article was originally posted on AARP

As cold and flu season rages on, health experts are warning people with high blood pressure to think twice before popping or pouring over-the-counter medications to relieve their symptoms.

Decongestants, a common ingredient in cold and flu drugs, constrict blood vessels to help relieve congestion. And constricted blood vessels can temporarily raise blood pressure levels and reduce blood flow

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Medical Matters and Aging Seniors Well-being for Aging Seniors

‘It never occurred to me I was having a heart attack.

This article was originally posted on Yahoo News.

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Medical Matters and Aging Seniors

Why we need to take borderline diabetes seriously

This article was written by Dr Eno from Women Living With Diabetes.

When it comes to awareness around type 2 diabetes, there is one fact that leaves me feeling somewhat discouraged. And that is the realization that healthcare providers are not doing a very good job about educating the public about borderline diabetes.

I can’t tell you how many times I have seen patients who just seem nonplussed when they tell me they were diagnosed with borderline diabetes several years ago and have not followed up for any additional tests. What’s even more scary is that they really were not told what they needed to do. So it’s no surprise when I see them several years later in a hospital setting and diagnose them with type 2 diabetes. Sometimes they may even have begun to suffer from some of the complications associated with type 2 diabetes.

According to recent statistics released by the Center for Disease Control, there are over 80 million people living with borderline diabetes in the United States. And the scary thing is that majority either do not know they have borderline diabetes or are not doing anything about it.

In this collection of articles from my blog, I share information on why it is important to take borderline diabetes seriously by addressing some frequently asked questions:

  • Here, I highlight the difference between borderline and type 2 diabetes and why it is important to know the difference.
  • A question that gets asked frequently by people who are well-informed about borderline diabetes is whether it is possible to reverse it. This article reveals how how one strategy you can implement today can help reduce your risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes.
  • I also wrote about the relationship between diabetes in pregnancy and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes later on in life.

 

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Contact me at 317-480-1038 today. Let